OSHA Listens

Recently OSHA held a public meeting “OSHA Listens”, asking for public feedback on key issues the agency faces. The following nine questions were the different topics discussed:

 

What can the agency do to enhance and encourage the efforts of employers, workers and unions to identify and address workplace hazards?

What are the most important emerging or unaddressed health and safety issues in the workplace, and what can OSHA do to address these?

How can the agency improve its efforts to engage stakeholders in programs and initiatives?

What specific actions can the agency take to enhance the voice of workers in the workplace, particularly workers who are hard to reach, do not have ready access to information about hazards or their rights, or are afraid to exercise their rights?

Are there additional measures to improve the effectiveness of the agency’s current compliance assistance efforts and the on site consultation program, to ensure that small businesses have the information needed to provide safe workplaces?

Given the length and difficulty of the current OSHA rule making process, and given the need for new standards that will protect workers from unaddressed, inadequately addressed and emerging hazards, are there policies and procedures that will decrease the time to issue final standards so that OSHA may implement needed protections in a timely manner?

As we continue to progress through a new information age vastly different from the environment in which OSHA was created, what new mechanisms or tools can the agency use to more effectively reach high risk employees and employers with training, education and outreach? What is OSHA doing now that may no longer be necessary?

Are there indicators, other than work site injuries and illness logs, that OSHA can use to enhance resource targeting?

In the late 1980s, OSHA and its stakeholders worked together to update the Permissible Exposure Limits (PELs) (exposure limits for hazardous substances; most adopted in 1971), but the effort was unsuccessful. Should updating the PELs be a priority for the agency? Are there suggestions for ways to update the PELs, or other ways to control workplace chemical exposures?

There was some great discussions out in the blog & twitter world in response.  What would your advice to OSHA be?  Are there any suggestions in the area of safety glasses or fall protection in particular?

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Workplace “Safety” Around the World

It’s interesting the type of photos we see from around the world denoting workplace “safety.”   There’s always an abundance of pictures from China. Always.  It’s pretty apparent that fall protection safety is often over looked in many countries.

This guy is sitting on a 2 x 4 while working on a cantilever deck with no fall protection equipment protecting him.  Is it possible for that board to move while the worker is leaning or moving one way or another?  The only good news is he has lots of people around him to call 911 if he falls.

The Safety Guru group on Flickr has an interesting collection of safety photos from different contributors in locations around the world. I visit occasionally to see what’s new. Unfortunately I only post photos with direct permission from the photographer so I can’t use the 3rd party photos from that group. But you still can check it out and laugh… or groan.

Today’s photo was provide by P. Adkin which he shot when he was in China. Thanks so much for allowing us to use your photo.

Fall Protection Do Not's

Stay safe!

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Construction worker falls while working on platform.

Here is a great example of why fall protection is needed.  Do not try this at home.  I think this guy was texting during the fall protection training course.

 

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